How does WannaCry affect India?

Oct 24, 2017 by infocon in  cyber security Security

In emerging economies like India where the government is undertaking large scale digital initiatives and schemes, security has become a major concern. Cyber experts believe that the damage done by WannaCry ransomware is an issue of under-reported magnitude.

The use of pirated and outdated software is rampant among Indian users as well mid-size and small IT organizations. Fearing licensing issues, a huge number of these incidents will not be reporting the losses, concludes expert opinion on the latest cyber attack.

According to the Centre’s instruction to CERT-IN (Computer Emergency Response Team), “all the information of reported ransomware” have been collected into a report. Many of the cases across the country were isolated but the wave of attacks certainly shows that the impact to India is certainly a caution alarm.

The report states these places as worst hit by WannaCry:

1. 10% of Vadodara’s total computers in the District Administration Collectorate Office.

2.  Computers in Panchayat offices of Wayanad and Pathanamthitta districts in Kerala.

3.  120 computers connected with Gujarat State Wide Area Network in Gujarat.

4.  18 systems of Andhra Pradesh Police Department.

5.  Systems in the Tirumala Tirupati Devasthanams (TTD) Shrine in Andhra Pradesh.

6.  Computers of the Personnel Department of the Southern Railways’ Palakkad Division.

7.  Computers in several locations of the Police Department of Maharashtra.

8.  Many attacks happened in computers across Kerala and Tamil Nadu.

 

A brief on India’s Cyber Security Status

Oct 17, 2017

The biggest story of 2016 is undoubtedly the alarming rise of cyber crime. A look at global IT industries explains that we’re facing a lack of efficient professionals. According to the Cyber Security Ventures ‘Cyber Security Jobs Report’, there were 1 million cyber security job openings in 2016. The number is expected to grow to 1.5 million by 2019.

Against the backdrop, the scenario of India’s cyber security industry is no exception. A quick glance at one of the most notable security breaches in the country shows:

1)   Cyber criminals breached the country’s largest government site – the Indian Railways Catering and Tourism Corporation (IRCTC) website, stealing around 10 million records from the server of the e-ticketing portal.

2)    A cyber criminal by the name ‘Faisal’ allegedly breached the website of Canara Bank, defacing it by inserting a malicious page and blocking some of its payment services.

3)    Fraudsters broke into the email account of Binny Bansal, CEO of Flipkart, sending two emails to the Chief Financial Officer (CFO) demanding a sum of $80,000.

Further look at similar incidents show that majority of these attacks happened in the e-commerce and banking sectors. The reason for this is found to be a high value of personally identifiable information )PII) in these industries.

According to ‘M-Trends 2016, Asia-Pacific Edition’ by Mandiant Consulting, Indian organizations are more susceptible to data breaches. Poor investments in high-end security solutions are to blame, as experts say. This must sound caution to smaller and bigger organizations both.

In the wake of this, the Indian government has started to invest money in recruiting cyber security experts. Partnerships with top international security firms have also been registered. The recent Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the national cyber security agencies of India and the U.K. is a step in the direction. The exchange of technical information on cyber attacks, security incidents and solutions will benefit both countries in fighting cyber crime together.

India witnesses one cyber crime per 10 minutes: 2017

Oct 17, 2017

With increasing number of people in India going online every year, the risk of cybercrime hovers above. The rise of smaller organizations and their less or no protection of data also leads to maximum cases of security breach.

In the first six months of 2017, India saw one incident of cybercrime per 10 minutes. These include ransomware attacks to minor phishing rackets. The Indian Computer Emergency Response Team reported 27,482 cases between January and June.

Phishing, scanning, probing, viruses, defacements, site intrusions and denial-of-service were the most reported incidents. Ransomware attacks are gaining pace in India.

1.71L crimes have been reported in the last 3.5 years.

 

The RBI has also issued warnings about bitcoins, the preferred mode of payment for attackers.

Here is a list of the most remembered security breaches in India last year:

  • Mirai botnet malware: A botnet malware named Mirai took over the Internet targeting home router users and other IoT based devices. The malware affected 2.5 million IoT devices; it’s not clear how many systems were affected in India. CERT—In had also issued an advisory regarding the attack back in October 2016.

 

  • WannaCry: Ransomware WannaCry swept the world in May. CERT-In immediately put out an advisory notice. Few instances of the ransomware were reported to have hit banks in India, and some businesses in Tamil Nadu and Gujarat as well during the first wave of the attack. Railwaire users were also most affected by the ransomware.

 

  • Petya: India was also on the top 10 list of countries to be hit by Petya ransomware attacks, with the country faring worst among other Asia Pacific (APAC) countries, cyber security firm Symantec said in a blog postlast month. Globally, India took the 7th spot with less than 20 organisations being affected as per the Symantec’s analysis.

 

 

Bringing Information Security to book – Infocon initiative

Oct 21, 2016

How much information security is enough security ?

Infocon is an initiative by Prime Infoserv, Kolkata and Wordsmith has been a collaborator in the initiative. Any contemporary CXO who is not concerned with the theme and confusion called Information Security is either non-existent or soon will face bankruptcy judge.

Billions are lost by private and public institutions worldwide through loopholes in securing information. Information is literally money. If you are a financial institution and if your customer database is compromised, then the fall-out can be seriously embarrassing to catastrophic.

The Problem of Mr. K, a CIO of the castle called Kolkata 

Mr. K is a  CIO of a large healthcare company in Kolkata. His 60% life was spent without internet and when his career is at the matured peak, he finds that he needs to reckon with information security. His CEO has instructed him to “do something”. What he should do ?

In case of an enterprise, any “doing” needs management time, money and attention (follow-up). More important, no vendor appears to be able to answer the question : “How much information security is good security ? “How much I should spend, considering the solutions are correct ?” 

Mr. K, found to his great confusion that he is not able to get these “figures”.

In a autumn morning in Kolkata, post-Durga Puja last year,  I and Sushobhan, CEO of Prime met Mr. K in his East Calcutta office, overlooking the wetlands of Calcutta that appear to be merging with the Sunderbans.  Mr. K narrated his predicament, especially the most important one – “How much money and resource he should ask for approval ? ” from his top management to implement the solution selected. The problem with the solution was its very nature : the solution is directly connected to the threat – real, perceived, imagined or enmeshed in the business interest of the information security vendor.

The Mathematical Model

In other words, we need an analytic framework backed up by the cold, austere and objective mathematical perspective other than paranoia, vendor interest, disaster porn, technical jargon, hardware and software vendor with their exotic offerings lined up in the form of priests of some esoteric cult.

There is a mathematical model called Gordon-Leob model that does exactly that. It uses mathematical tools like probability, confidence interval, distribution to produce a mathematically verifiable statement

After the coffee, I and Sushobhan told Mr. K that he should spend no more than 37% of the amount X, where X is calculated by

X = Cost * Maximum probable vulnerability * Impact Constant * Quantified Risk

Mr. K was delighted. He is now at least dealing with arithmetic, not anxiety-metric.

In due course, we did find out X for his organization by using a 4 step method which is basically a combination of police work + detective work. In the first step, we did a vulnerability analysis and logged all known risks, in the 2nd step, we had assigned some metric to those risks in consultation with the company. In the 3rd step, we calculated the probabilities of such events, in the final step, we tabulated the impact and then estimated X.

Since then, we have been working in this area with clients in India, Bangladesh, UK and everywhere we found one common aspect : lack of awareness. Then the idea of Infocon was born.

Infocon 2016 is happening on 18th November – a platform for sharing our confusion, triumph, fear, best practices and combining our torches in a same direction to create a path in the literal jungle of information which not only has exotic fruits, flowers and scenes but ferocious enemies.

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